December 14, 2017 2 min read

Yes Christmas is here and many of us like to return to childhood memories of this wonderful time of the year.   Many of us can relate to a Christmas story (1983);  the movie about Ralphie who wanted an official red Ryder Carbine Action two hundred shot range model air rifle and his mom said no you’ll shoot your eye out.  Red Ryder, the name of a popular comic strip cowboy, was branded across the wood stock  of the Daisy airgun ensuring Daisy would be synonymous with BB airguns.

My Grandfather, who owned a general store, let me shoot his Red Ryder which he got in order to scare pests away.  It was manufactured about the 2nd year of production and actually had a higher velocity then any of the Daisys I ever had.  I still have this B.B. gun.  Daisy, over the years, has manufactured many different models.  The lever model was made in more varieties than any others.  The pump model 25 was very popular since it’s beginnings in 1913 and has been resurrected a few times in various forms.  The Red Ryder was commemoratedwith a 50th anniversary model in 1989.  One year under the Christmas Tree I became Ralphie only my B.B. Gun was a target special B.B. rifle with competition model peep sight.  I still have this model today.

Daisy, in 1961, started production on their “spitting Image” B.B. guns.  The first one was a Winchester type 1894 lever B.B. gun following the resurgence of interest in the cowboy.  The model 572 field master BB Gun was the 2nd in the spitting image series.  A close copy of the Remington Pump 22 Rifle,  Daisy also resurrected the S/S BB Rifle calling it a model 2.  It wasn’t successful, but is very collectable.  

Daisy also made BB pistols.  My brother had a bullseye target pistol.  It had a thumb swell just like a 22 pistol and it cocked by pulling back the slide.

My grandparents would go to Florida every winter and bring me back Hubley cap guns.  Then one year for Christmas I scored a Daisy Double Holster set of cap guns.  The holster was a black and gold pressed leather with scalloped design.  The Holster survived but the guns didn’t survive my son.

While I was rereading my diatribe we just received one of the largest Daisy collections that I’ve seen. We will start selling it in February or March

So I started digging up old ads and catalogues.  The comic book back covers brought back great memories.  As I mentioned before one of the gifts of aging is the memories give you rose coloured glasses sometimes.  

Merry Christmas and don’t “shoot your eye out”

Wayne Goble
Wayne Goble


Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in When the Smoke Clears

Remington Model 700: “The World’s Most Wanted Rifle”
Remington Model 700: “The World’s Most Wanted Rifle”

June 03, 2021 6 min read

In 1962 Remington announced the new model 700 ADL (Average Deluxe) and BDL (Better Deluxe) and within a year or so even Remington management was stunned by the rifle’s success.

Remington would follow this success with the 700 Classic, a straight stock with no monte carlo or cheek piece and satin finish. In 1981 Remington offered the 700 Classic in a limited production in caliber 7mm Mauser and every year there after the Classic was only offered in one special caliber.

Read More
The Russian Invasion of 1966
The Russian Invasion of 1966

July 14, 2020 5 min read

In 1956 a gentleman named Rudolph Koppe, who had immigrated from Germany, took on a couple new firearm lines: Baikal & Vostok Firearms from Russia. These firearms were from Tula and Tzhevsk in the Soviet Union, both of which had been gunsmithing centers for over five centuries. To the best of my knowledge this was the first quantity of firearms in North America from the communist country and I believe Ruko had exclusive rights to North America but because the U.S. would not allow Russian imports, it was basically Canada. For the next 25 years +, Ruko imported shotguns, 22 rifles and 22 target rifles and pistols from Baikal & from Vostok.
Read More
The Canadian Boy's Gun
The Canadian Boy's Gun

January 21, 2020 4 min read 3 Comments

I’ve talked about Cooey firearms before but I’m not sure whether I have really driven home how much the Cooey firearm, especially the 22 rifle, dominated the Canadian Firearms landscape. Many shooters now find room in our budget for a new Browning T Bolt or a Ruger 10/22 or something in a CZ 457 series or Anschutz Target Rifle, but my question is this: will you ever find the excitement or early murmurs of adulthood that came with your first outing with Dad, Grandad or your big brother and a Cooey? 
Read More