September 25, 2017 2 min read

1 Comment

The above brands of ammunition mean very little to anyone under 50 or so. To gentleman hunters, seasoned senior target shooters, veteran tin can shooters and old farts that shoot, the above ammunition names bring back memories of limiting out on ducks by 8 o’clock. A pistol match with 8 Xs and 2-9s. The first deer hunt up north. Maybe just being young blasting tin cans. All the memories are brought to you by C.I.L. or Dominion Cartridge Company.

The 1940’s, 50’s and 60’s saw The Canadian Industries Limited Ammunition Company on every shelf in gunshops, hardware stores and general stores. I grew up in a general store that was connected to our house. We had groceries, nails, nuts & bolts, clothing, boots, china and of course ammunition. We carried only C.I.L. ammunition. Shotgun shells were Canuck Maxium and Imperial good, better, best. You could buy a box (25) of maxium 1 ¼ oz for $3.95 or 5 shells for 95¢. C.I.L. Whiz-bang you could buy a box (50) of either 22 shorts, 22 longs or 22 long rifle. I believe a box of 22 L.R. was about 59¢. We would order in Dominion 30-30 and other centerfire on special order. Hobbs Hardware, a wholesaler, in London was our C.I.L. ammo source.

A trip down memory lane

C.I.L. also marketed a variety of firearms under their logo. Savage made the Mod. 607 12ga. pump shotgun, the Model 830 bolt action in 222 Rem. and 30-30 Win same gun as the Savage Model 340 but had a light finish hardwood stock. This was my first centerfire rifle in 222 Rem. I shot over 100 groundhogs one summer when I was 15 years old. My first shotgun was a C.I.L. 402 20ga. 3”single shot good quality Brazilian made (C.B.C.) shotgun which was also marketed by Remington as the Model 812.

            C.I.L. had a deal with Parker Hale to market their 1200C as a C.I.L. Model in calibers: 243 Win, 270 Win, 30-06 Spec, 308 Win. Anshutz Firearms were also marketed under the CIL banner. CIL Firearms are a study on their own which I will expand upon in the future.
Wayne Goble
Wayne Goble


1 Response

Brett Hiltz
Brett Hiltz

June 03, 2021

Yes I’m older than 50 so I do truly remember CIL, Imperial etc. In fact I still have a lot of 3006 Imperial brass and I was wondering how is it for reloading now compared to FC, Lapua and other current mfgs.
Trying to get my loads dialed in and don’t really want to have to start buying Lapua or Hornady brass.

Thanks for the help

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